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The Normans Anglo-Norman
(1066-1215 AD)

 

The Normans, also known as the Norsemen, are a group of people who captured England and formed colonies in Normandy. They played a crucial role in both the cultural, political, and military affairs in the region. Their influence spread as far as the Mediterranean, and they are primarily known for their conquest of England that occurred in the year 1066. The Normans are descendants of the indigenous population that lived in the area of Scandinavia. They begin residing in Normandy during the 9th century, and the region of Normandy existed in what is now northern France.

In the year 911, Charles the Simple gave the Normans land near the Seine River. This would eventually become the Duchy of Normandy. The Normans were ruled by Hrolf, and he gave his allegiance to Charles. Over time, the Normans would go on to take up Christianity as their religion and they would also begin speaking the Gallo-Romance language. It is these two things that made the Normans distinct from both the Scandinavian and French population. The Normans had a culture that could be described as very resourceful. It is this characteristic that allowed them to create territories in various places on the European continent.

Many people make the mistake of confusing the Normans with the numerous other Viking groups that existed in Europe. They are commonly confused with the Danes in Britain. Many historians have described the Normans as being shrewd, eloquent, and adept at flattery. They were also quick to assimilate with the populations that surrounded them, and because of this, it is hard to find traces of this group today. The Normans were known for taking the feudal system that existed in France to apply it to both England and Normandy. However, there were differences between the upper French classes and the Norman warrior classes.

The French aristocrats were known for being able to trace back their ancestry to Carolingian age. The Normans, in contrast, were unable to trace back their ancestors to the 11th century in most cases. Many of these knights did not have a large amount of wealth. Many of the Norman warriors would play an important role in the Crusades. It should be noted that the Norman language has survived to the present day. The Normans had been travelling back and forth to England for many centuries. The connection between the Normans and native population were cemented through the marriage of Emma to Ethelred II.

In addition to England, the Normans were also present in Wales. Edward the Confessor Established Ralph as the earl of Hereford, and it was his responsibility to defend the region against the Welsh. In addition to Wales, the Normans were also present in Scotland as well. They would go on to build castles and establish aristocratic families in the region. This would result in the rule of kings such as Robert the Bruce. In addition to this, a number of Scottish clans were founded as well. However, it was David I of Scotland who was primarily responsible for introducing Norman culture to the region.

Original Authors: Stephen Palmer
Edit Update Authors: M.A.Harris
Updated On: 23/07/2008



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